Yith Nuru

When reading up on your lovecraftian horror, you will notice two very distinct and important themes.

The first is based on Lovecrafts literary philosophy of cosmicism. Stories emphasize the horrible insignificance of humans by comparison to the almost metaphysical creatures which are implemented into (the background of) the stories. Older, bigger, wiser and more powerful than humans, they escape your cognitive faculties and even our senses, frequently driving protagonists insane. What’s left are secondary anecdotes, scriptures of cults surrounding these eldergods or the last testimonies of witnesses (before they commit suicide). Suspense is primarily carried by an omnipresent dread. A threat not only to the body but your existence as a whole. In Lovecraft’s universe you are either blissfully ignorant, have been driven insane or you are “one of them”.

 

The other theme is slime.

Sometimes it’s stinky. But gooey slime seems to be of the utmost importance. To the point that you start wondering if the choice of marine settings are less about the deep and dark unknown and more about having an excuse to make slime more plausible. His creatures include borderline-metaphysical beasts of unimaginable power, overcoming our puny sense of time and death. But by god, if the thing is to have physical form, it better be Flubber’s second fish-cousin once removed. Adding a very different and (in my opinion) needless element of disgust, heavily colliding with the awe inspiring horror of these beings, which are otherwise fascinatingly attractive, making you crave more knowledge about them.

Disturbingly (but not surprisingly) this resonates heavily with Japanese literature and pop culture. And we all know what rustles Japanese jimmies. (“Dagon-senpai, iiiiieaaaaaaaah!”)

So if you either enjoy cosmic horror, questioning your significance OR also have a disturbing obsession with slime (making everyone else uncomfortable), Lovecraft is your guy.

 

Cthulhu fhtagn. You sexy slimy beast.

sexy-cthulhu

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